My Top 5 Tips for Reaping the Benefits of Journaling

Sometimes I have to write to think. This isn’t always true. I do my very best thinking on my bike. But, I do my second-best thinking when I write. My most consistent writing is my daily journaling practice.

There are several practices I use to keep myself on track toward my vision. Journaling is one of these. Without it, my day would be incomplete, and I would feel disorganized and rattled. As Benjamin P. Hardy says, “Daily, you need to ensure you’re going the direction you want to. If you’re truly committed to those changes, you’ll need to prime yourself daily to be and act from the position of the new reality you’re striving to create.” Journaling is a key component of my daily priming.

There are many benefits of journaling. The biggest one for me is its centering effect. Journaling helps me organize my thoughts into a coherent whole, so they make sense. Doing so brings me a sense of peace, returning me to a feeling that all is right with the world, if my day has left me frazzled or scattered. As I shared in this post, I use a fairly structured approach to the journaling I do each night. That may or may not be the best tactic for you.

Journaling is a very personal practice, and there is no right or wrong way to do it. There are some techniques that can make your journaling more rewarding, however. Most people think of journaling as writing in a blank book or diary. This is what I generally mean when I talk about journaling. For people who better express themselves with drawing or other graphics, journaling doesn’t have to be restricted to the written word.

Here are my top five tips for getting the most out of a journaling practice.

One of my previous journals.
  1. Choose tools you love. As I get close to filling up one blank book, I look forward to selecting my next one. Personally, I don’t use anything fancy, but there are features that I prefer. I usually look for a spiral-bound book because I like to keep my pen there when it is not in use. Beyond that, I want a book that has lines, rather than plain, white pages. Those who incorporate drawing may want unlined pages. Finally, I consider how it makes me feel. Is it peaceful or inviting? Does it have a meaningful quote and/or picture on the front? I want a journal that feels like a treat to use. Some people may prefer to journal electronically, either typing or speaking into a device. This is valid, too. Utilize whatever means of capturing your thoughts, ideas, dreams and musings feels the best. If you are writing or drawing, use a pen that is pleasant and flows smoothly over the page.
  2. Develop a habit. I do most of my journaling right before going to bed. The potential downside to that is that I sometimes doze off while writing. It does help to put everything in place before I go to bed, though. Whether you choose to write at night or some other time, I recommend choosing a consistent time and making it a non-negotiable habit—simply what you do before bedtime, upon awakening or after meditating, for instance.
  3. Include questions. I love questions, both for myself and for my coaching clients. Provocative questions open doors to ideas that might not otherwise present themselves. There are some that I use consistently. Two that I currently find very beneficial are: “What is the boldest leap I took today? And, “What bold leap will I take tomorrow?” The possibilities for your questions are endless. Questions help me reflect on my day and position me to set a powerful intention for the next day before I go to sleep.
  4. Free write when you are so moved. Although there are certain components I include every night, I also free write when I feel like doing so. This is a terrific way to explore and understand my emotions. Sometimes, I do this when I am upset or angry. Sometimes, I do it when I am overwhelmed with gratitude for my many blessings. I simply write from my stream of consciousness. It can be tremendously cathartic, and I recommend trying it.
  5. Record your inspirations, vision, dreams, goals. All of these and more go into my journal. Lately, I have had several bursts of inspiration in the middle of the night. I sleep with my journal, and book light right next to me, so it is easy to reach for them and record the inspiration before I lose it. Similarly, I will write down ideas that come to me on my bike. I try to get them on paper as soon as I can after returning home from a ride. Make your journal your place to express your deepest desires for the future and to spell out your commitment to bringing them to life.

There are so many ways to benefit from journaling. In my experience the most important thing is that your practice is authentic to you. Try my ideas if you are new to journaling or if you want to give journaling a more prominent presence in your life, but, ultimately, your practice should serve you. It should help you grow and increase your ability to live with no regrets because writing your aspirations and sorting out your feelings on paper add clarity to your life. When you are clear, you can take the steps you need to take to turn aspirations to facts in your life.

Catch up with the previous posts in this “Top 5” series:

  1. My energy tips here
  2. My mindset tips here
  3. My well-being tips here
  4. My plant-based nourishment tips here
  5. My meditation tips here

Connect with me at sheri@justwindcoach.com. To connect with others who are interested in living as well as possible and get regular doses of inspiration, become part of our JustWind Producers of Power & Purpose Facebook group here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1958072857557272/.

My Top 5 Tips for Building a Spirit-Nourishing Meditation Practice

Continuing my series of “Top 5” posts, I share here my best tips and most important practices for developing the energy, mindset and well-being to accomplish what we want to accomplish and live with no regrets. If you want to catch up on past posts, you can read my energy tips here,  my mindset tips here, my well-being tips here and my plant-based nourishment tips here.

I want to be clear that I do not consider myself a meditation expert. However, I am proud to have practiced meditation on a consistent, daily basis for the past year and a half. I realize that is nothing compared to many practitioners, who have meditated for decades, but it feels like an achievement to me because I believed for many years that I was incapable of meditating. I realize now that part of the reason for this was my narrow view of what constitutes meditation. Mostly, I have referred to what I am doing as a mindfulness practice, as opposed to a meditation practice. Lately, though, I have come to view mindfulness as a broader state of being, of which my daily meditation practice is a part. I feel like I have developed my own, evolving practice that serves my needs and feeds my spirit. My goal in this post is to share the most helpful strategies I have used for cultivating this practice.

  1. Approach your practice with self-compassion. The single most helpful idea I have come across regarding meditation is contained in these words by Sharon Salzberg: “Beginning again and again is the actual practice, not a problem to overcome so that one day we can come to the ‘real meditation.’” That idea is so freeing and makes so much sense. Much like what I have learned about living in the present moment, rather than waiting for my “real life” to begin at some future point, when everything is in place, Sharon Salzberg’s words encourage me to recognize the value of compassionately beginning again, when my thoughts distract me. The discipline of doing so is the practice. It validates that, as long as I continually release the thoughts when I recognize that they have highjacked my mindfulness and return to my breath, I am meditating exactly as I “should.” There is nothing to correct, and I am experiencing all the benefits of a meditation practice built on commitment and resilience.
  2. Develop a ritual. Make your meditation practice a non-negotiable part of your day. It has become as crucial to my well-being as exercise. I find that it works best for me to practice in the morning, either immediately upon waking or directly following my morning workout, if it is in my downstairs gym. My mindfulness extends to my time on the bike and, to a lesser extent, walking, but this does not replace my daily dedicated practice time. It is bonus time that is often extremely fruitful, yet my day would be incomplete without my meditation ritual. Look at your schedule, decide what works best for you and implement a ritual for getting into the right mental space. Part of my ritual involves solitude, at least mentally. I am pleased to report that I successfully maintained my daily practice while Biking Across Kansas by meditating in my sleeping bag immediately upon waking each morning. Although I was in a room full of people, I found solitude in the darkness. By establishing a clear ritual that includes a time and place, as well as a beginning routine, you will set yourself up to practice consistently.
  3. Open your mind to what meditation can look like, and allow your practice to evolve.  For a long time, I thought meditation was only sitting cross-legged on the floor and releasing all thought. I can’t remember what changed my mind and allowed me to consider a more expansive definition. My health coach training? Maybe. Whatever it was that opened my mind to crafting my own practice, I am grateful. I believe in finding what resonates with you and allowing it to evolve when your instinct leads you in a different or additional direction. My current practice looks like this: I begin with square breathing. Then, I mentally recite my Sankalpa (which I updated after reflection on my 50th birthday). I express gratitude for guidance, wisdom, direction and protection and release what no longer serves me. Affirmations and visualizations help deepen the meaning of m practice. I include a couple Kundalini yoga poses that I find calming. Depending on what I feel I need, I may include Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT). I also always choose a quote for reflection before I begin and spend time simply focusing on my breath. This assortment of components really works for me. Experiment and trust your instincts to develop a practice that is uniquely yours. Be open to allowing it to evolve. This has made all the difference for me.
  4. Use a meditation app. I use Insight Timer (free version) and love it. There are others out there, as well as a premium version of Insight Timer. Find what works best for you. The functions I find most useful are the timer, ambient sound and the tracker. I set the time My life is full, and, at this point, I generally set the timer for five to 15 minutes, although I sometimes choose to continue meditating after I hear my ending tone. I like the variety of ambient sounds offered by Insight Timer and vary them day by day. Finally, I feel motivated by the “streak” I have built up on the tracking log (318 days consistently using Insight Timer). Although it is not the reason I meditate, I want to keep my streak going!
  5. Feel and express gratitude for your practice. Recognizing the benefits meditation has bestowed on me, I am deeply grateful for the freedom and dedication to meditate. I feel like a whole world has opened to me. Part of my practice reflects this gratitude. I truly look forward to my daily meditation and feel a burst of excitement in my body when I prepare to practice. I am so thankful that meditation has become part of my life. Remembering this adds depth and richness to, and enhances the benefits of, my practice.

I have been amazed at the benefits I can attribute to my consistent practice. I feel healthier than I have ever been. There are other factors contributing to my well-being, but I believe that my meditation practice has put me over the top, apparently enhancing my immunity and certainly improving my stress-management ability. I am happier and more peaceful. My gratitude for the many blessings in my life is deeper. I still have plenty of room for growth, but I have become a true believer in the power of meditation. I would love to assist you in your journey toward living with no regrets. Connect with me at sheri@justwindcoach.com. You can also click this link to schedule a complimentary coaching call. To connect with others who are interested in living as well as possible, become part of our JustWind Producers of Power & Purpose Facebook group here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1958072857557272/.

My Top 5 Tips for Plant-Based Nourishment

This post is the fourth in a series of “Top 5” posts, in which I share my best tips and most important practices for developing the energy, mindset and well-being to accomplish what we want to accomplish and live with no regrets. If you missed the others, you can catch my energy tips here,  my mindset tips here and my well-being tips here.

As I have mentioned in some of my other posts, one of the most basic ways I take care of myself is through plant-based nourishment, wich contributes significantly to my energy, mindset and well-being. Here is a very brief overview of the many health benefits of plant-based nutrition.

I hear a lot of questions, concerns and objections to eating plants exclusively. I won’t address all of those here, but I hope these tips will help you understand that it is easy to eat nourishing, delicious plant-based food.

  1. Keep it simple. Use this simple formula for preparing plant-based meals that are tasty and nourishing: Beans + Greens + Grains. You can choose from any number of combinations of these three types of foods to create quick meals that satisfy. One of my favorite examples is black bean burritos. Rinse and drain some black beans (or any bean really). Combine them with spinach and frozen corn in a saucepan. Sprinkle some cilantro and any other seasoning you like into the mixture. Serve as a burrito, on whole-grain tortillas, or as a bowl. It is quick, delicious and full of nutrients.
  2. Find a go-to resource or two for recipes and meal-planning. Two of my favorite are The Engine 2 Diet, which contains a meal-planning matrix for every day of the week, and lighter.world, which allows you to set up a profile of preferences and will then give you three recipe choices each for breakfast, lunch and dinner every day of the week. Whether or not you follow these resources precisely, they are great guides for getting started, as well as for ongoing inspiration. A good plant-based-eating resource (There are countless others. These are just two that I use regularly.) will help you avoid ruts and keep you motivated to stick with your commitment to healthful, compassionate eating.
  3. Be prepared. It is easier than ever to eat a plant-based diet in the mainstream world. However, it still requires some planning and flexibility to do it well. I just finished my 21st trip across Kansas on a bicycle (www.bak.org). Over the years, I have had more and more options to eat, largely because the Board of Directors (of which I am a part) does a terrific job of communicating with the host cities to raise awareness that there will be people with a range of dietary needs and to suggest to them what they can serve vegans and vegetarians in their fundraiser meals. Still, on BAK and in my everyday life, I carry back-up snacks. I don’t function well wen I get hungry, so I make sure I have something to eat if a catered function or restaurant dinner is disappointing or inadequate. Fruit, nuts, nut butter packets and bars (like Macro Bar or ProBar, among many possibilities) are easy to carry and will hold up in a bag or purse. If you are going to be traveling, use an app, like Happy Cow, to find restaurants that are friendly to plant-based eaters.
  4. Ask questions. Just as you need to read labels to make sure there are not sneaky animal-based products in food that you purchase, it is important to ask questions in restaurants or at catered functions and potlucks. It can be done in a friendly, courteous way, such as, “Do your rice and beans contain any animal products, like lard or animal broth?” If you are committed to taking excellent care of your body and/or to living your ethics through plant-based nourishment, it is important to take the initiative to find out if a certain food will meet your needs or not. Your health and ethics are too important to acquiesce to the mainstream, out of fear of offending someone.
  5. Be adventurous. There was a time when I was frequently asked, “So, all you eat is salad?” That was never the case (although a good salad is wonderful), but it is definitely not true now, when there is so much more awareness of, and interest in, plant-based eating. As long as it is made from plants and serves your nutritional needs (minimal added oil, sugar, salt, processed items), be open to trying new food. Just this past weekend, in Holton, KS, a sweet, grandma-looking woman told me that she had “researched diligently” to learn how to make vegan breakfast burritos with tofu, potatoes, onions and a delicious combination of spices. She was adventurous and willing to try a new way of cooking. Those of us eating plant-based should be open to trying new things. Pick a vegetable you have not tried and Google a recipe or preparation instructions. Try tofu and tempeh, if you have not. Experiment with different plant milks (almond, flax, coconut, rice, soy, oat, cashew—endless possibilities!).

There are so many delicious ways to nourish yourself with plants. Commit to the lifestyle, own it proudly and take responsibility for making it work for yourself. Let me know how I can help. Although my primary motivation for being vegan is ethics, health is close behind. I am grateful for my good health and am convinced that the way I eat is a major contributing factor. I would love to assist you in your journey toward living with no regrets. Connect with me at sheri@justwindcoach.com. You can also click this link to schedule a complimentary coaching call. To connect with others who are interested in living as well as possible, become part of our JustWind Producers of Power & Purpose Facebook group here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1958072857557272/.

My Top 5 Tips for Creating True Well-Being

This post is the third in a series of “Top 5” posts, in which I share my best tips and most important practices for developing the energy, mindset and well-being to accomplish what we want to accomplish and live with no regrets. If you missed the first two, you can catch my energy tips here and my mindset tips here.

What does “well-being” mean to you? For me, “well-being” means excellent physical and mental health, accompanied by a deep sense of inner peace and confidence that comes from living my purpose. It may mean something different to you, but my guess is that it encompasses some of the same elements.

Much like mindset, I find that well-being requires constant attention and maintenance. It is not a destination that I reach and remain, without additional effort. However, these are some of the habits and practices that I have found to be crucial components of my well-being:

Outdoor Vegetable Market
  1. Live a vegan lifestyle. Not only is eating plants the most health-promoting way of nourishing my body, but it also allows me to live my most important value—compassion. Living my values is part of well-being for me. Doing so promotes inner peace. I believe that all of us—human and non-human—are the subjects of our own lives. While we enhance our lives by choosing to serve others in a variety of ways, no one—human or non-human—is on this planet to be used by others. By eating plants, my conscience is free, and I feel good about what I am putting into my body. Not long ago, someone asked me if I would get sick if I ate meat. I answered that I might, since my body is accustomed to plants. I have been vegetarian since 1982 and vegan since 2008. But, even more than potential physical effects, I told her it would be very emotionally upsetting. Even the thought makes me feel queasy. Compassion is such an important value to me that violating it would seriously compromise my well-being. Cultivating well-being in our lives requires an honest examination of our conscience, as well as asking ourselves what choices truly support health and inner peace.
  2. Move my body daily. Physical activity plays a dual role in my life, too. Besides keeping me physically healthy, movement is one of the most important factors in my well-being. It makes an unbelievable difference in my mental health. Research has shown exercise to be at least as effective as pharmaceutical anti-depressants, in many situations. It is my biggest stress reliever. Finding a type of exercise that you enjoy is most important. It is valuable to incorporate a variety of types of exercise, including cardiorespiratory exercise, resistance training and flexibility work. It doesn’t have to be complicated, though. Finding something that you will do on a regular basis is more important than constructing a perfect training plan. (If you want more precision, hire a coach with experience in physical training or a personal trainer.) It is better to do something than to have a perfect plan that you don’t execute. A friend recently posted this quote on her Facebook page: “Cycling isn’t a hobby for me. It’s my inner peace.” I absolutely relate.
  3. Practice mindfulness and meditation. Consistently implementing a morning mindfulness practice that includes meditation has made a tremendous difference in my well-being. I have felt, and been, healthier in the past year than I probably ever have. My resistance to colds has been strong. While everything I mention in this post plays into my physical health, I think committing to my mindfulness practice has ratcheted it up another notch. Part of that is probably due to (presumably, based on how I feel emotionally) lower levels of stress hormones circulating in my body. High levels of stress hormones are associated with inflammation, which contributes in a wide array of health problems. Reducing inflammation by decreasing dietary stress on the body (See item #1.) and through increasing inner peace through mindfulness and meditation truly can keep us healthier.
  4. Honor my passions. Some people think that honoring our passions as adults is selfish. I disagree. I think our passions are critical aspects of who we are and are key avenues through which we grow and develop. If there is something that excites you, take time to learn about it and engage in it. Passions come in a lot of different forms. Mine include cycling, reading, writing and contributing to the creation of a healthier, more compassionate world through building my coaching business and living a vegan lifestyle. I grow through all these activities. Ignoring them would leave a void in my life. I believe that they excite me for a reason, and I have both the privilege of, and responsibility for, honoring them. I am a better person when I do. Your passions—those things that truly excite and ignite you, those things that won’t leave you alone—are also there for a reason. Honor them to become more of who you are meant to be and enhance your well-being.
  5. Engage in regular introspection. I am an introvert, which simply means that I energize by spending time and space alone. It is exhausting to be around people constantly, without some time alone. Introspection is one of the treats of my time alone. When my son was young, one of the most difficult aspects of parenting for me was feeling like I could never be alone in my head because of constant noise and company. My bike rides were my salvation (and they still are, even though life is different now). They were the only way I could get a little time on my own to be in my head. Whether or not you are an introvert, there is value in introspection. It is how we figure out who we are, what we think, what we believe, what is most important to us. Journaling is a great way to be introspective, and I do it at least nightly, but my time on my bike, where I can think freely is another terrific opportunity to be introspective. I love to think about a question as I ride. It could be anything that helps me understand more about what matters to me. For example, “What is clearly no longer serving me?” was a recent question I pondered on the bike. This helped me make some important decisions. Experiment with the best ways for you to ask yourself key questions and spend time examining them. It will be good for your well-being.

While your definition of “well-being” may be different than mine, I encourage you to try my tips and see how you feel. My guess is that you will feel better, even if you just incorporate one of my tips into your life. If you choose to include them all, I expect that you will feel exponentially better. These tips are not miracles or cure-alls. I do not live in a perfect state of well-being. However, my state of well-being is much more consistent and persistent than it was prior to prioritizing these things in my life.

Bicycle Shadow on the Road

I would love to help you improve your well-being. Contact me at sheri@justwindcoach.com or 316-259-9728, if you would like a complimentary coaching call. You can also click this link to schedule an appointment. To connect with others who are interested in living as well as possible, become part of our JustWind Producers of Power & Purpose Facebook group here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1958072857557272/.

My Top 5 Tips for Cultivating a Mindset to Accomplish What You Want to Accomplish and Live with No Regrets

This post is the second in a series of “Top 5” posts, in which I share my best tips and most important practices for developing the energy, mindset and well-being to accomplish what we want to accomplish and live with no regrets. We get one chance to live this life. Let’s make it the grandest life we are capable of living!

In the last couple years, I have become increasingly aware of the critical importance of mindset in helping me move through life with more power, clear purpose and grateful joy. Our mindset consists of the established beliefs and attitudes we have toward life. One of the mantras I have used for years acknowledges the strength of mindset in our lives, even though I don’t use that word in it:

“My thoughts shape my perception, determine my actions and behavior and create the life I envision.”

This is a mantra I developed, based on inspiration from writing and quotes that had resonated with me. This mantra has meant so much to me. It has helped calm and center me. It has brought me peace. It has strengthened me. Even before I recognized it as a statement of the power of mindset, the mantra served to shape mine.

In her terrific book The Upside of Stress: Why Stress is Good for You and How to Get Good at It, Kelly McGonigal teaches the concept of “mindset interventions.” She says that the best mindset interventions involve being exposed to a new way of thinking, engaging in practice and application of the different way of thinking and teaching others the new perspective. Her whole book was a form of mindset intervention of this life-changing concept: “A meaningful life is a stressful life.” This idea and the mindset intervention her book produced helped me realize that most of the stress in life comes from things that have meaning to us, with work and family being top. To eliminate all stress would be to eliminate all meaning. The key is to look at stress differently and realize that we can choose to grow through it, as well as to observe it, without getting completely sucked in by it. While this is easier said than done, viewing stress this way is much more helpful and empowering than viewing myself as a helpless victim of it. This is an example of the power of mindset.

Here are my top five tips for cultivating a mindset that positions you to accomplish the things that matter, so that you can live free of regrets:

I have become increasingly clear that my mindset is critical to my success or failure, when it comes to bringing big dreams to life and achieving goals that matter to me—the things that I will regret if I don’t do. Big dreams and goals can be intimidating, and they require digging deep into the reserves of our determination, resolve and resilience. Getting to, or repeatedly returning to, the mental and emotional place necessary to accept the challenges to make these things happen won’t occur without a mindset of self-efficacy and trust—in ourselves, in the Universe, in the basic goodness of life.

My collection of quotes
  1. Adopt a mantra. This can be a word, a phrase or a sentence that you devise, or it can be a quote that is meaningful for you. I use a combination, and I vary them regularly. There are some, like the one above, that are tried and true and that I use at some point (or at several points) just about every day. Others may be with me for a moment, a day or a season of life. Words are very meaningful and powerful for me. I have a collection of quotes that I have been growing for 18 years. I am on my sixth formerly blank book, with pages covered, front and back, in quotes I have collected from a wide range of sources. I find a lot of them in the books I read. I sometimes record them from webinars or podcasts. Sometimes an individual or a sign or a t-shirt strikes me, and I write down the quote. Some of my quotes are from well-known thought leaders. Others are from more obscure authors. Some are my own creations or words that come to me in a dream or upon awakening. I refer to my quotes several times, every single day. I travel with my current book, so that I have at least some of them with me, even when I am Biking Across Kansas. These quotes are my most sacred texts. You may find your mantras in more traditional sacred books or in prayers. You may have one, or you may rely on many, like I do, but I encourage you to adopt a mantra as a centering mechanism, something that can help you to return to the mindset you desire to embrace and embody. Personally, I like to focus on a mantra at transitions—upon awakening, before exercising, before getting in the shower, before driving, when I turn off my booklight to go to bed, etc. When I choose a mantra (usually at semi-random) before a bike ride or drive or shower—some time when I can think—I may ponder it deeply for several minutes or longer. Other times, it may just provide momentary focus that helps me remember what matters to me. Either way, reflecting on a mantra is one of the most valuable tools for cultivating a mindset that allows me to behave in the way I want to behave and stay focused on achieving my goals.
  2. Meditate. There are many ways to meditate, and I used to believe that I couldn’t do it. However, for well over a year a now, I have had a consistent morning mindfulness practice that includes meditation. My advice is to keep it manageable. Realize that anything is progress. Generally, my morning meditation is between five and 20 minutes, depending on the available time. At its most basic level, meditation is simply stilling your mind to be in the present moment. It is as simple as:
    • Sitting or lying comfortably with a fairly straight spine. You don’t need to be cross-legged, on a meditation cushion; you just need to be comfortable.
    • Closing your eyes or gazing gently at the floor in front of you.
    • Focusing on your breathing. I usually focus on the feeling of the air as it moves in and out of my nostrils.
    • If your mind wanders (and it will), simply notice and return your attention to your breath. I took a mindfulness course last fall, and one of the most helpful ideas I gleaned from it was to imagine sitting by a stream and to picture my thoughts as falling leaves. When I become aware of a thought, I watch it land on the water and simply float downstream. I use that technique to return to my breath.
  3. Implement rituals. Rituals are key for maintaining a beneficial mindset. These tips I am listing are not mutually exclusive. This is because, while each of these ideas is effective on its own, there is synergy when they are put together or used throughout the day. My rituals often reflect this. Rituals help me to feel that all is right with the world. They remind me of what matters, what I want to accomplish and how I want to behave. Here are some of the rituals I use daily:
    • Finding my mantras and/or quotes for reflection
    • Upon awakening, naming three things to which I am looking forward in the upcoming day
    • My morning mindfulness practice
    • Breathing exercises when stressed and before I eat
    • Journaling nightly, including my “3 Good Things” journaling (I also do this mentally throughout the day, if I am feeling stressed, asking myself, “What are three good things that have happened so far today?)
    • A bedtime series of fascial release movements
  4. Follow thinkers who inspire you. Read books by authors whose message supports your mission. Listen to podcasts. Listen to audiobooks. Watch videos. If possible, attend conferences, workshops or lectures. Any of these can serve as a booster shot for your resolve. Some of the current thought leaders whom I use to support my desired mindset are:
  5. Cultivate gratitude. My “3 Good Things” ritual is one of the ways I cultivate gratitude, but I have found that intentionally looking for the positive gives us so many more things for which to be grateful. Colleen Patrick-Goudreau says, “I heard someone say once that all our life experiences are either lessons or gifts—that we either learn from our daily experiences or they are simply blessings to be treasured and appreciated. I like that. It means that every moment is an opportunity to grow or to be grateful (or both!).” This perspective is an excellent example of maintaining a winning mindset by using gratitude. I consciously notice and feel awe throughout the day for my countless blessings. Doing this instantly shifts my mindset back to a more helpful place, if it has started to stray.

Try these five suggestions for cultivating a mindset to set yourself up for living with no regrets. It is not a one-and-done endeavor. I find that it takes daily attention, but each dose of mindset intervention, using the things I list above, takes me farther down the road in the direction of my big dreams, even if the steps (or pedal strokes) are slow and plodding at times.

If you would like help cultivating the mindset you need to live the way you want to live and to help ensure that you are living with no regrets, schedule a complimentary call, using this link.

“How different our lives are when we really know what is deeply important to us, and keeping that picture in mind, we manage ourselves each day to be and do what really matters.” –Stephen R Covey