FREE Spring into Action Move for Your Mind 30-Day Kickstart Class

Did you know that the way you think about the physical activity you do affects how your body responds to it?

Do you realize that our mental interpretation of the signals our bodies are sending during exercise can be more important to success than the actual signals?

Are you aware of the way that physical activity affects our ability to remember and think as we age?

How would you like to activate the production of “Miracle-Gro® for the brain”?

Do you know what cost-free, drug-free intervention has been shown to be at least as effective as pharmaceutical methods in combating depression in many people and also has benefits for supporting individuals experiencing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder or recovering from addiction?

The synergistic relationship between body and mind can benefit all of us. It is a bi-directional relationship; the mind influences the body, and the body influences the mind.

Some forms of movement, like yoga, Pilates and SoulCycle, intentionally seek to emphasize the interaction between body and mind, and sport psychology has utilized the connection since the late 19th century.

We are just two weeks away from spring. This is a great time to start moving if you have spent too much time on your couch or been otherwise sedentary this winter or to step up your activity level if you are already someone who moves your body on a regular basis. All of us can benefit from setting appropriate physical goals and taking action to achieve them.

“If you want to be happy, set a goal that commands your thoughts, liberates your energy and inspires your hopes.”

–Andrew Carnegie

Setting a physical goal—and it doesn’t have to be anything dramatic like running a marathon or cycling across the country—and using techniques to actively engage our minds in the process of achieving it can be a tremendous boost for our mental and emotional well-being.

I am very aware of how much physical activity has done for me over the last few decades and how much it continues to do for me every day. I teach a Wichita State University online, self-paced, 0.5-credit-hour badge course called Mind & Movement. (You can still register for this semester! Click here to get started.)

Because I believe so strongly in the symbiotic relationship between mind and body, I am offering my totally free Spring into Action Move for Your Mind 30-Day Kickstart Class inside my JustWind Community Facebook group. I would love to have you join us.

Registration opens today and will run through the first day of class, March 20, 2021—which happens to be the first day of spring!

In this class you will:

  • Set a physical activity goal of your own choosing, incorporating both outcome and progress (strategy) targets
  • Learn how to set a goal that is both achievable and motivating
  • Understand more about how our body and mind interact to support each other, enhancing both mental and physical well-being
  • Be guided to progress safely toward your physical activity goal
  • Experience actionable techniques that enhance the interaction between body and mind
  • Utilize positive psychology to improve your quality of life and increase your chances for success
  • Receive practical tips for supportive nutrition and hydration—regardless of how gentle or intense your physical activity is
  • Become motivated to take your progress during the 30-day class into life beyond the class
  • Get inspired to use your improved mental, emotional and physical well-being to make the difference you want to make in the world
  • Have access to the free companion workbook I have designed for the class.

All of this will take place within the safe and supportive environment of my private JustWind Community Facebook group. (If you are already a member of the group, simply send me your email address in a private message to let me know you are interested and receive access to the companion workbook.)

Along with other content, during the 30-day class, there will be:

  • Weekly Facebook Live lessons
  • Weekly Q & A sessions where you can submit questions ahead of time or ask questions live during the broadcast
  • Replays available after live sessions
  • Guided visualizations
  • Journaling exercises

I would love to help you Spring into Action for yourself. Please click here to request to join the JustWind Community Facebook group. You will be prompted to enter your email address if you want the companion workbook.

You’ll have access to existing group content as soon as you join, and the class will begin on March 20, 2021, the spring equinox.

I’m setting my own goal and working through the process as I guide you through it. Let’s motivate each other!

While you are waiting for the class to start, click the button below to subscribe to my newsletter and receive a link to download my Blossom 2021 Self-Coaching Workbook to get you inspired. (This is a different workbook from the one you will receive in the course.)

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Follow the JustWind Coaching Facebook page here. (This is not the group, just my business page.)

I want to reach as many people as possible with the inspiration and information in this class. Please share this post with your social media connections and/or invite individuals to join the course with this link.

Let’s Spring into Action together!


What to Do When Willpower Exhaustion Threatens to Derail Your Good Intentions

Do you often start the day with plans to eat healthfully, exercise and avoid getting trapped in the mental vacuum of screens big or small, only to find all your good intentions have fallen to the wayside by late afternoon? Why is that?

Do you find it easier to stick with the habits and behaviors you want to keep on some days than on others? Why?

One reason may be willpower exhaustion, also called decision fatigue or ego depletion. No matter what we call it, most of us experience it from time to time.

Personally, I most often experience it in the mid-afternoon during a very full workday, where I have had to do a lot of thinking, on other people’s schedules, rather than one of my own choosing. I am especially prone to it when I am feeling overwhelmed by how much I have to do and how many hours I am likely to be doing it.

Our brains are fueled by glucose. When we are at rest physically, our brains are responsible for consuming 60 percent of the glucose used by our entire bodies.

So, thinking hard, without adequate opportunities for rest, burns through a lot of glucose, leaving us feeling physically and mentally worn out.

This makes it harder to make good decisions and harder to stick to our goals and intentions.

We can’t always avoid this situation completely, so how can we minimize its effect on us?

Here are some things that can help:

  1. Expect it. If you know you have a full calendar of intense mental activity for the upcoming day, be prepared. Have healthful, nourishing snacks readily available. This way, you are less likely to grab a candy bar or chips. Fruit with nut butter; hummus and veggies or homemade trail mix, made with mixed raw nuts and/or seeds, dried fruit and a sprinkling of vegan dark chocolate chips (like Enjoy Life brand) are just a few of the options. Make sure it is something you like and make it easy, but also make it nourishing. When willpower exhaustion hits me, I often feel “desperate” for food. Knowing in advance what I pan to eat and having it easily accessible makes it more likely that I fuel my body and brain in a productive way.
  2. Oxygenate your brain and body. Breathing exercises are beneficial for helping to calm our nervous system and fill our bloodstream with fresh, oxygenated blood. There are many good options that can be done quickly most anywhere. Simply take a moment—eyes open or closed—and try this: First, breathe out forcefully through your mouth. Next, inhale through your nose for a count of 4. Hold your breath for a count of 7. Exhale with a whoosh through your mouth for a count of 8. Complete this cycle four times. This helps you relax by stimulating your parasympathetic (rest-and-digest) nervous system, and it refreshes your brain with oxygen-rich blood.
  3. Get up and move for a few minutes. When we are in the midst of busyness and mentally-draining activities, it can be hard to allow ourselves to take a break. One helpful practice that I have used for a long time is a brief bathroom-break walk. When I get up for a bathroom break, I take a quick walk on a predetermined loop. Since I have been working from home, it is a loop around the interior perimeter of my home, both upstairs and downstairs. It takes less than two minutes, but it gives me a short mental and physical break. As I walk, I do a mental run-through of the 3 Good Things practice, identifying three things that have gone well so far in the day. Then I think of three things to which I am looking forward for the rest of the day.

These three strategies don’t eliminate willpower exhaustion—at least not for me—but they help. When I am buried in busyness, it can be hard to discipline myself to take the breaks to grab a healthful snack, breathe or walk, especially if other people are around, but it feels good to take care of myself with these simple practices. When I use them, I am more likely to keep eating in a way that honors and nourishes my body, and the physical effects of stress feel less intense.

Do you experience willpower exhaustion? What does it look like for you? What helps to alleviate its effects?

In addition to the techniques I mention above, being clear about what we want to achieve and why can also help us stay on track with our intentions, even when willpower exhaustion strikes. Click the button below to subscribe to my newsletter and receive a link to download my Blossom 2021 Self-Coaching Workbook, with powerful questions to help you live the way you want to live and make the difference you are meant to make. Working through the questions can help you identify what’s really important for you and steel your resolve against the insidious repercussions of willpower exhaustion.

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3 Keys to Increasing Consistency in Life and the Benefits of Doing So

Continuing to work on my book, I have been thinking and writing about consistency recently. It is a trait that is important to accomplishing most things in life. As I have mentioned in previous posts, my book-writing strategy centers around Anne Lamott’s guidance, “A page a day is a book a year.” Adhering to that basic pace is working. I have written nearly 29,000 words. If life gets in the way of my daily page, I catch up the next time I am able to write. With a hectic first week of classes at the University and a completely occupied Saturday yesterday, I will be catching up today. With consistent practice, I am making steady progress.

What we do—or don’t do—on a regular basis sets the stage for what we are able to accomplish in life. This is true for our health, our relationships, our academic and professional endeavors, even our spiritual growth. Our patterns create our lives.

Why is this true?

Consistency allows us to plan. Whether it’s a cross country training program or a regular meditation practice, we can plan when we are consistent. When a coach has a consistent, coherent, structured program and openly communicates that plan with his or her athletes, they know what to expect, how to eat before practice and how to supplement practices with outside training. Absence of consistency—randomness—leaves us floundering. Performance suffers. Mental sharpness deteriorates. When we are consistent in our practice, or when we are provided with consistent structure to our days, we know what to expect and can plan effectively.

Consistency fosters trust. When people in our lives are consistent, we can trust them. We feel safe. Inconsistency leads to unpredictability, which is not comforting in a work, home or school environment. When we are consistent in our habits, we can trust ourselves to do what needs to be done.

Consistency simplifies decision making. Because I have a consistent daily habit of exercise, I don’t have to debate with myself whether or not I will exercise. The type, duration and intensity of physical activity varies from day to day, but I plan it into my schedule each day. I don’t have to decide. My consistency is my commitment to myself.

Consistency creates excellence. Consistent effort is how we get good. No matter how much innate talent someone has, dedicated work on a consistent basis is still necessary to become highly skilled and to perform reliably. Practicing any habit or skill in an arbitrary fashion will limit the progress that can be made. Consistency facilitates a solid foundation on which to build stronger skills and from which to reap benefits.

“Consistent” does not mean “boring” or even “the same.” Some people place a high value on spontaneity and shrink away from the idea of being “tied down” to consistency. They fear that life will become dull and monotonous if they develop and maintain consistent habits. I disagree. I believe consistency frees us to have bigger wins and more fun. We are better able to direct our energy and effort into productive activities when we are consistent. Rather than internally battling over whether or not we will eat in a certain way or move in a certain way, we just do it. We can trust ourselves, and we can plan our lives.

“He who every morning plans the transaction of the day and follows out that plan, carries a thread that will guide him through the maze of the most busy life. But where no plan is laid, where the disposal of time is surrendered merely to the chance of incidence, chaos will soon reign” ― Victor Hugo

How do we build consistency into our lives?

  1. Schedule: In my experience, the best way to ensure that something we say matters is accomplished is to schedule it. Either put it physically into the calendar or at least know when it will be (definitely) done. It is difficult to achieve consistency—whether in a training program or in taking daily steps toward a goal, like writing a book—unless we schedule when the activity is going to happen. Scheduling automatically elevates the priority level of the activity. It becomes non-negotiable when we equalize it with other important appointments in our lives.
  2. Commitment: Schedule it; then, follow through and do it. Keep the promises you make to yourself. Believe that you are worth it. Truly believe that it is a non-negotiable part of your day.
  3. Purpose: Know why you want to become consistent. Why does it matter if you follow through with what you said you wanted to do? What does consistency achieve for you? What do you have to lose if you are not consistent? By taking the time to consider these questions and answer them for yourself, you have something on which to draw back when life throws challenges your way. When we are clear why something matters and frequently remind ourselves of the reasons consistency is important, it becomes so much easier to maintain.

No matter what it is you want to achieve, I encourage you to ditch erratic efforts and decide if a habit, a practice, a training program, a nutritional strategy really matters to you. If it doesn’t, maybe that is what you need to ditch. Stop pretending it is important. Admit it is not. Move on. If it truly does matter, then schedule it, commit to it and do it. Consistently.


2020 Vision

I have been planning this post in my head for a few weeks, since I did some year-end reflection on a bike ride. During that ride, I came to the realization that I need to take a different direction with my coaching practice. That insight planted the seeds for what I am calling my 2020 Vision. I’ll share more about that later in this post, but first, I’ll explain the review approach I took this year.

On that bike ride a few weeks ago, I considered what I believe are my biggest accomplishments in 2019 and the major lessons I have learned in 2019.

The most valuable insight that I gleaned from reflecting on my accomplishments and my lessons was a sudden understanding of why I have struggled to find traction with my coaching business. I have felt myself losing enthusiasm for the logistical and marketing aspects of the business, and my mission has often felt fuzzy. Suddenly, on this ride, reflecting on accomplishments and lessons, I understood why.

The model I was taught and the language out there in the online coaching community have never fully resonated with me. I have had a persistent sense of uneasiness about them. During this review, I was able to admit that to myself and, more importantly, to accept it, so that I could consider other options.

Energized by my new understanding, I felt inspired for the remainder of my year-end review, which I did in my journal. This year, I decided to use a version of my nightly journaling practice, scaled to an annual perspective. Here is what this process looked like:

  • 3 Things that went well in 2019. Just like I do every night to reflect on three things that went well for that day, I examined the course of the year and identified the three things that stood out to me has having gone particularly well, whether through my own efforts or life’s gifts. It is important to acknowledge our blessings and successes.
  • 3 Things I am looking forward to in 2020. Each morning before getting out of bed, I think about three things to anticipate during the day. It makes getting out of be easier and inspires hope and excitement. In this case I considered what I look forward to making happen in 2020, not just what I hope will happen. What actions am I taking to achieve these goals?
  • What is the boldest leap I took in 2019? Each night I determine the boldest leap I took during the day. Sometimes it is something big Sometimes it is littler. But I always figure out what it was. I thought back on the year and decided on the boldest leap I took in 2019. This felt good—acknowledging an accomplishment, even while it is still a work in progress.
  • What bold leap will I take in 2020? On a nightly basis, anticipating this leap establishes a plan and an intention for the next day. From an annual perspective, it does that for 2020. These are my most aspirational goals for 2020, the ones that will inspire and enthuse me to push through the challenges I will face.

That’s it. From the answers I found to these questions, I formed my 2020 Vision. I love the metaphor that that 2020 gives us—clear, perceptive vision that we can trust to guide us in the right direction.

An empty road with grass on the side of the street

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So, as we head toward the new year, this is my 2020 Vision:

Rich Litvin says, “A goal is a place to come from.” My 2020 Vision is written from that perspective.

  • In 2020 I am grateful for my vibrant health and vitality, joyfully maintaining a weight that optimizes my health, my performance on the bike and my sense of self.
  • In 2020 I am thankful that my master work, centered around health and compassion, is supported through the rich rewards of the abundant Universe. Secure in this knowledge, I am peaceful and confident around money.
  • In 2020 I am fully present in my important relationships, including with myself.
  • In 2020 I am doing work that matters, integrated under a theme of health and compassion.
    • I am providing compassionate academic advising to future health and fitness professionals.
    • I am teaching an online course that I developed to share the concept of empowered movement.
    • I have written and obtained a publishing deal for, my book, which teaches that we have the power to choose our perspectives, and the ones we choose shape our lives.
    • I am helping people who are motivated by health and and/or ethics to eat, move and think in healthier, more compassionate ways, improving the quality of their lives, while making a positive difference in the world. I have chosen the optimal model for my coaching practice and am grateful that it aligns with my values and my priorities.
  • In 2020 my daily meditation practice results in an even deeper, more meaningful connection with my Source.

I am grateful for the many blessings and lessons that 2019 has brought. I remember feeling discouraged and disappointed at the end of 2018. This year, I can reflect on several accomplishments and feel good about them. I also know I have learned so much about myself, and I have developed a greater trust in my ability to find solutions to the problems and challenges I encounter.

I am excited when I think about the possibilities and promise that 2020 holds.

I will keep my readers posted, as I decide exactly how my coaching practice and online presence will evolve. I am clear that my focus will center on plant-based nourishment, empowered movement and the JustWind mindset. In fact, my 2020 motto is:

Eat. Move. Think. Health & Compassion.

Happy New Year!


Changing Seasons and Moving Forward

I am writing this post in the first week of the dark, cold return to Central Standard Time. This is always a sad time for me because the end of daylight saving time marks the end of my cycling season. Returning to standard time in the curtailed sun-lit hours of autumn eliminates any possibility of weeknight rides because it is dark by the time I get home from work. The cold, blustery Kansas fall and winter will make cycling opportunities hit-or-miss, even on weekends.

This is hard for me. I love cycling. It is my release and my freedom. The bike is where I remember who I am, when the everyday challenges and responsibilities of life, even those I have chosen, threaten to obscure my true self. On top of that, this is heavy advising season at the University, so I really, really need my bike rides.

I have been continuing my basic page-a-day plan for writing my book. This week, I have been working on the early pages of Part 2, in which I will share many lessons learned from the perspective of a bike saddle. As I wrote in my inaugural blog post, back in 2015, cycling has shaped my mindset and the structure of my life in so many ways. It continues to serve as the inspiration and framework for my book and to be a source of joy (as well as fitness) for which I am extremely grateful.

I hear people say, “I like the change of seasons.” Honestly, I don’t. I would be perfectly content with perpetual summer. I like long days and warm air. I realize I would still lose my long days in warmer parts of the country or world, but that might be easier to take if it were not also cold. The end of daylight saving time, admittedly a human-made construct, and with it, cycling season, feels more significant to me than the autumnal equinox.

My goal with this post is not to whine and complain, though. It is to move forward positively, as I reflect on another season of safe and healthy cycling with gratitude. While I honestly believe that I would be just as grateful for my safe and healthy cycling if I could ride as much as I want all year, I can choose to reframe this time in a constructive way.

I can use this off season for increasing my yoga practice, working to strengthen my body for life and cycling, and comporting myself with grace and gratitude through these next four months to achieve as much peace and productivity as possible.

All of us will encounter periods of life when things are not exactly as we would choose. We have two options in those situations. We can stew over our displeasure and feel victimized by circumstances, or we can find a way to make meaning of our situation and create something positive.

That is the challenge for us. When trapped for a period in conditions that deviate from our ideal, what are we going to make of the time?

The key is catching ourselves before we slide into a trench of despair or self-pity. We have to notice when we are at risk for taking this plunge. This requires self-awareness and a conscious decision to choose a higher, more uplifting path.

Then, it takes the determination and self-discipline to pursue that path. Daily meditation helps me, and continuing my rides on the weekends and days off work, weather permitting, will also help. Once we have made the decision to choose better, we need reliable means of staying centered or recalibrating when something throws us off course.

Maybe you love winter. Maybe you are one of the people who relish hibernating indoors and love nothing more than a movie marathon. Even if that is true, and you are in your element with the short, dark, cold days, there will be times, seasonally or otherwise, when you are less than satisfied with your current conditions. What choice will you make—self-pity or positive forward movement? What centering or recalibrating strategies will you use? Do you need help finding your way?

It benefits us to have a consistent daily practice and a strong commitment to our values in place, so that when circumstances unsettle us, we can fall back on them to remind us of what matters most and help us keep moving forward, even if slowly.

Today, Saturday, is forecast to be a nice day. Pretty soon, I am going to gear up and go for a bike ride. Getting my bike fix when I can makes so much difference. It is a matter of making the most of our circumstances and taking opportunities when they present themselves. I’m grateful for this gift of a reasonably warm and sunny day on weekend. I will use the gift to continue to propel myself onward in the best, most positive way I can during this off season, so that I can accomplish the physical, creative, professional and personal development goals that are important to my commitment to living with no regrets.

Let me know how I can help you establish the habits and practices that will enable you to continue moving in your desired direction, regardless of what life throws at you.